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#womenslives: “When women are too busy cleaning and cooking, they have less time for paid work” - @olgakhazan

For example:

“American women spend more than two hours daily on chores, compared to just 82 minutes for men. Even in Finland, a country that seems more progressive on gender issues, women sweep, scrub, and change diapers for 137 minutes daily, and men do for just 91.”

Those differences are going to get pretty big over time. Look at this (complied bu OECD / Melinda Gates):

And here’s the thing:

“[…] when women are too busy cleaning and cooking, they have less time for paid work. Girls in many countries fall behind in school because they’re swamped with tedious chores.”

This is an equality, economic and development issue.

Piece by Olga Khazan on the Atlantic:

All over the world, women are doing work they’re not getting paid for. In rich countries, it might be folding the laundry or staying home to take care of a sick child. In developing countries, unpaid labor tends to be more physically arduous, like hauling water and chopping wood. Wherever you are, it’s considered women’s work.

Melinda Gates picked up on this disparity in her travels throughout the world. Every year, she and her husband, Bill Gates, write a letter outlining their philanthropic priorities. This year, she devoted her portion of the letter to the burdens of unpaid work on women.

“Unless things change, girls today will spend hundreds of thousands more hours than boys doing unpaid work simply because society assumes it’s their responsibility,” she writes in the letter, which is written for a teenage audience.

According to the OECD and other sources, women devote more time than men to chores in nearly every country. American women spend more than two hours daily on chores, compared to just 82 minutes for men. Even in Finland, a country that seems more progressive on gender issues, women sweep, scrub, and change diapers for 137 minutes daily, and men do for just 91.

© and read the rest of this piece: Melinda Gates and the gender gap in household chores (the atlantic)