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#WhyWeMarch #WhyIMarch #WomensMarch:

Women’s rights are human rights

This diverse coalition came out not just to protest Trump’s agenda but to state that women’s rights are human rights, and that the president of the United States is obliged to respect the rights of migrants, Muslims, Latinas and Latinos, people with disabilities and the LGBT community – under domestic and international law.

In Latin America, it was natural that women would take to the streets on this occasion. Women across the region are systematically killed and sexually abused with impunity under the same misogynistic culture that underpinned President Trump’s comments about sexual assault.

The Women’s March adds to the recent women’s movements in Latin America – Ni Una Menos and Paro Nacional De Mujeres (National Women’s Strike) among them – representing what the feminist movement has long aspired to: women’s unity around the world.

Rarely have women’s movements and feminists managed to appeal to other identities. The most visible part of movement has, both intentionally and unintentionally, often excluded those with less privilege, like Latina, Muslim and Black feminists, by championing causes seen as narrow and concerning only white women.

Ditching the ‘nice white lady’ agenda

During the early stages of planning, the organisers of the Women’s March on Washington were accused of forwarding a “nice white lady” agenda that neglected the class, race, gender and religious issues facing non-white women.

But by the end, the march’s list of speakers included not only white feminist activists like Gloria Steinem and celebrities such as Scarlett Johansson and Madonna, but also a long list of Latina, Black and Muslim feminists. Legendary Black feminist Angela Davis, Latina actor America Ferrera, singer Alicia Keys, the Mothers of the Movement representing Black Lives Matter, and Pakistani Muslim activist Hina Naveed all spoke.

Women marching worldwide revive a long-sought dream: global feminism