#research: #maleficentmisogyny: sex in pornography

I was 12. I thought Kate and I were simply too naive to aspire to the heights of sexual maturity to which the boys had risen.Their wisdom seemed self-evident – they did, after all, studiously compare notes on the hottest porn star on RedTube, and congratulate one another on the previous night’s masturbation.It only occurred to me recently, at the still tender age of 20, that these boys had no idea what they were talking about. Yes, they could name dazzlingly complex sex positions such as the “backward upside down cowgirl” that I thought only a contortionist could achieve. But, really, they were just pontificating on the basis of a few illegally downloaded porn films, traded around on memory sticks at break time.Only a year before, they had been trading Pokémon cards.My first lessons about sex didn’t come from sex education lessons, but were filtered through pre-pubescent boys, who received their information from porn. A 2008 report into youth exposure to pornography, carried out in the US, found that from a pool of 5,000 undergraduate students, 93% of boys and 62% of girls had been exposed to internet porn before the age of 18. The report also found that “boys were significantly more likely to view online pornography more often and to view more types of images”.Porn provides a huge bank of sexual imagery, at the click of a button. Regrettably, it often depicts aggressive sexual acts – a 2010 analysis of 50 bestselling adult videos in the US found that 88% of the scenes included physical aggression. This aggression is overwhelmingly carried out by the male, with the target of the violence being a woman 94% of the time. In addition, porn rarely depicts romantic intimacy, tending to omit kissing, verbal compliments or laughter.Sex is now referred to, among other things, as “beating” and “boning”. These brutal terms reflect the depiction of sex in pornography, with its archetypes of the dominant male and submissive female.

See also:– Pornography: The Normalization of Violence and AbuseNUS study: large numbers of students find out about sex from pornography

ChildLine reports receiving calls from young people every day, worried about how unlimited access to online pornography is influencing their perceptions of sex. One young teenage boy told them: “I’m always watching porn and some of it is quite aggressive. I didn’t think it was affecting me at first but I’ve started to view girls a bit differently recently and it’s making me worried.”

Porn depicts sex without responsibility, in a way that is both acceptable and alluring.I learned this the hard way, as the young women I knew would be rated out of 10 for “fuckability”. I learned this, too, when I was coerced into having sex with someone I was scared of. I learned this when I saw some of the degrading acts regularly played out in porn films replicated in bed.Sadly, I also learned to be scared of sex.

© and read the rest: The Guardian