feimineach.com

OK, so, we all need to stop laughing first of all that the study’s author is called Dr Boring. That’s unfortunate. Stoppit!

Moving on: a study which examined over 22,000 student evaluations in France has revealed that “male students give much higher scores to male teachers, in terms of overall satisfaction as well as in all dimensions of teaching” and that “male students are 30 per cent more likely to rate male teachers’ overall satisfaction scores as excellent than when evaluating female teachers” (THE).

And in other telling findings: “female teachers are evaluated relatively favourably on dimensions such as the preparation and organisation of course materials, the quality of instructional materials, and the clarity of assessment criteria” (skills that require a lot of work outside of the classroom) while "male teachers tend to obtain more favourable ratings by both male and female students in less time-consuming dimensions of teaching, such as quality of animation and class leadership skills” (THE).

These findings are related to those reported here on women, emotional labour and hours spent "in service” in academia. In short, the sexist bias in academia seems to mean men do more “front of house” (and rewarding and rewarded) work while women do more of the harder, hidden slog.

From the Times HE:

Research from France offers evidence that “students appear to rate teachers according to gender stereotypes”, with male students giving higher scores to male lecturers.

That is the conclusion of a paper by Anne Boring, a postdoctoral researcher at L'Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris, better known as Sciences Po, to be presented at the European Economic Association’s annual conference, which takes place in Mannheim later this month. Her database consists of 22,665 evaluations by 4,423 first-year undergraduates of 372 different teachers in a single university.

French “universities make promotion decisions, including tenure, on evaluation of achievements in a combination of research, teaching and service activities”, writes Dr Boring, adding that “teaching effectiveness” is “mainly evaluated through student evaluations of teaching (SET)”.

Her analysis suggests that “male students give much higher scores to male teachers, in terms of overall satisfaction as well as in all dimensions of teaching”. One clear sign of this is that “male students are 30 per cent more likely to rate male teachers’ overall satisfaction scores as excellent than when evaluating female teachers”, Dr Boring writes.

Such differences have no basis in “actual teaching effectiveness”, since “students perform equally well on final exams, whether the teacher was a man or a woman”, she argues.

Source and rest: Times Higher Education.

(Excerpt etc. first posted on feimineach.com. Orig. attribution above.)

Female lecturers ‘suffer from gender biases’ in student ratings